Sarah Morris – Prints Mounted

Sarah Morris was an artist I was looking into originally to see if the works would be able to feature in my dissertation, however there were more suitable artists in the end and I decided to not use her. However, after looking through some works I took note of the way Morris mounts and displays work.

Sarah Morris, Dulles [Capital], 2001

An extract from Tate.com states that “Displayed in this way they provide an off-centre variation of Morris’s painting Constitution Gardens 2000, (private collection). Each print is numbered in the lower right corner to designate its position within the overall grid. The bottom row is made up of large blocks of colour which become more broken up in the middle row. By the top row the dense three-dimensional structure has become an intricate array of fragmented blocks and splinters of colour. Alternatively, the prints may be displayed individually or in smaller groups based on their positions within the full scheme.” https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/morris-dulles-capital-p78599 (Accessed 7/3/19)

The idea of there being multiple instructions of how to hang the work is interesting as I have not experimented with this method, I enjoy the variety of hanging and the idea of havign the same exhibition, yet also having differences, I also take note of the precise sizing of the gaps in the prints. These are all elements I should consider when hanging my prints

Sarah Morris, Dulles [Capital], 2001
Since 2000: Printmaking Now : Exhibition Shot
https://www.moma.org/calendar/exhibitions/79?

Another element of this piece that interests me is the idea of the way they are mounted, as you can see in the exhibition image, they are on a board of some sort, with the edges painted white, I enjoy how the boarders kind of stand out, but also would be interested if they overlapped the sides of the print.

Overall I find this extract from Morris interesting and a piece I will consider in my final prints and also in how to hang them.

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